History

"Where the Eagle is Flying!"

John started his train running in 1948, when he received his first train set for Christmas.  It was a Lionel set that consisted of a Lionel locomotive, boxcar, tank car, gondola, flatcar and a red caboose.  That train set provided many hours of play and fun.  Fast forward to 2011, John is still playing with that train set along with some newer pieces.

John started a massive project when he decided to add on to the house by building a new 14 x 32 foot workshop.  He built the shop so there would be a staircase to a second floor that he wanted to build and make this floor the new home for his childhood dream of building a large 3 rail O gauge train layout.

And so it began.  Construction started with a slab foundation, framing for the first floor, ceiling rafters that would support the second floor, more wall framing and a roof.  When he was finished John stood at the end of the driveway and said, "...this is good."

Next came the electrical, sheet rock on the walls and ceiling, tape, texture, paint.  The room was finished except the floor.  John reviewed several options for the floor and picked carpet.

With the workshop at the foot of the steps, there must have been a lot of going up and down those stairs before the bench work was finished.  About half way through bench work construction, John started laying track.  He just wanted to get some trains running on what he hoped would be the area around the Gladewater, Texas area and the Missouri Pacific Railroad.

John's first loop of track was Lionel fast track.  This loop would later inter-connect with the mainline loops that runs around the walls of his 14 x 32 foot train room.

Now that the mainline loops are completed, the industrial area built, John is planning his classification yard.

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Gladewater, TX, 1968. Operator R. T. Hall hands up switch list to crew of eastbound local headed by geep 385, and an unidentified F-7A.

Photo by Chuck Harris.